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"Hamlet"AUDITION DATES

Monday, Dec. 15, 2014 (by appointment only between 5 and 7 p.m.)
Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014 (by appointment only between 5 and 7 p.m.)

CASTING REQUIREMENTS

Hamlet requires a large ensemble of male and female actors.

Because Hamlet is a Young Actor Series production, the roles are restricted primarily to actors between the ages of 13 and 23.

However, actors ages 24 and older may audition for three roles only: Polonius, Queen Gertrude and Osric.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

Please prepare one memorized classical monologue that is approximately one to two minutes in length.

What is a classical monologue?

Generally speaking, a classical monologue is one that comes from a play written by either one of the ancient Greeks (Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles) or Shakesspeare. However, other playwrights who composed classical monlogues include Moliere, Marlowe and Ben Jonson.

CLICK HERE for classical monologues for men.

CLICK HERE for clasical monologues for women.

HOW TO SCHEDULE AN AUDITION APPOINTMENT

The auditions for Hamlet are scheduled in advance by appointments. On each audition day, actors will be slotted into 10-minute intervals. However, you may be asked to stay longer than 10 minutes at the auditions.

The audition appointments for Hamlet are being scheduled online only. Please do NOT call the Box Office to schedule your audition appointment.

CLICK HERE to schedule your Hamlet audition appointment.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S REHEARSALS

Rehearsals will take place five days a week, Sunday from 12 noon to 3:00 p.m., Monday through Wednesday from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.  Please list conflicts for every rehearsal.  Rehearsals will begin on Sunday, January 4th. 

Please bring your calendar with you to the auditions in order to declare any "conflict dates" between January 4 and March 8, 2015. Conflict dates reported after the show has been cast may result in re-casting.

The show's “tech” rehearsals are listed below. Please be aware that attendance at all technical rehearsals is mandatory. Conflicts of any kind cannot be accepted for these rehearsals.

Sunday, Feb. 22, 2014: Noon to 8 p.m. (“double dress” rehearsal)
Monday, Feb. 23, 2014: 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (technical rehearsal No. 2)
Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2014: 5 to 9 p.m. (technical rehearsal No. 3)
Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2014: 5 to 9 p.m. (the final technical rehearsal)

ABOUT THE PLAY'S PERFORMANCES

Hamlet will play for nine performances on Weathervane Playhouse's Founders Theater stage between Feb. 26 and March 8, 2015.

Please note: The performance schedule below includes three weekday-morning, school-day matinees:

Thursday, Feb. 26 at 10 a.m.
Friday, Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 28 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 1 at 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 3 at 10 a.m.
Thursday, March 5 at 10 a.m.
Friday, March 6 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 8, at 2:30 p.m. (followed by the attendance-is-mandatory strike of the show's set and props)

ABOUT THE PLAY

“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark!” When the King of Denmark is murdered, young Prince Hamlet seeks revenge against his Uncle Claudius for the untimely death of his father!

More About the Play

From Wikipedia: "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, often shortened to Hamlet, is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare at an uncertain date between 1599 and 1602. Set in the Kingdom of Denmark, the play dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet is instructed to enact on his uncle Claudius. Claudius had murdered his own brother — Hamlet's father King Hamlet — and subsequently seized the throne, marrying his deceased brother's widow, Hamlet's mother Gertrude.

"Hamlet is Shakespeare's longest play and among the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature, with a story capable of "seemingly endless retelling and adaptation by others." The play seems to have been one of Shakespeare's most popular works during his lifetime and still ranks among his most-performed, topping the performance list of the Royal Shakespeare Company and its predecessors in Stratford-upon-Avon since 1879. It has inspired writers from Goethe and Dickens to Joyce and Murdoch, and has been described as "the world's most filmed story after Cinderella.

"The play's structure and depth of characterization have inspired much critical scrutiny. One such example is the centuries-old debate about Hamlet's hesitation to kill his uncle, which some see as merely a plot device to prolong the action, but which others argue is a dramatization of the complex philosophical and ethical issues that surround cold-blooded murder, calculated revenge, and thwarted desire. More recently, psychoanalytic critics have examined Hamlet's unconscious desires, and feminist critics have re-evaluated and rehabilitated the often maligned characters of Ophelia and Gertrude."

ABOUT THE SHOW'S DIRECTOR

John DavisJOHN DAVIS previously for Weathervane Playhouse directed Our Town in 2013, The Taming of the Shrew in 2012 and the world-premiere production of Art of Deduction: Inside the Mind of Sherlock Holmes in 2011. A professional actor, director and fight choreographer for nearly 30 years, he is best know for his comic sword-fighting show, Hack and Slash, which has been seen in 16 countries with more than 4,000 performances (including more than 100 performances for the allied forces in both Iraq and Afghanistan).

He has received certification from five major stage-combat organizations worldwide and is a recognized instructor with the International Order of the Sword and Pen. Locally, he has taught courses for the theater department at Oberlin College and he directed Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead for the Cleveland Shakespeare Festival.


 

AUDITION DATES

Sunday, Dec. 7 at 8 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 8 at 7 p.m.
(Callbacks: Sunday, Dec. 14 at 7 p.m.)

CASTING REQUIREMENTS

Unnecessary Farce requires an ensemble of seven ADULT actors — four men and three women — between the ages of 20s to 70s.

Character Breakdown

ERIC SHERIDAN (male; age range 30s) A bookish, even-keeled police officer who's thrown into some difficult situations — while not wearing any pants.

BILLIE DWYER (female; age range 20s/30s) — A police officer, she is Eric's partner. Although she seems to lack every skill needed for police work, she is enthusiastic and eager to succeed.

KAREN BROWN (female; age range 30s) — An accountant who usually has a very professsional demeanor, but seems unable to keep herself in control today.

MAYOR MEEKLY (male; age range 50s to 70s) — He is a sweet, gentle fellow who seems very innocent (and with a capital "I")!

AGENT FRANK (male; age range 20s to 50s) — He's the Town Hall head of security. Although he can seem confident and gruff, in moments of crisis he is easily reduced to being a very frightened man.

TODD (male; age range 20s to 50s) — He speaks with a pronounced Scottish accent. He's a professional hit man whose accent gets thicker the angrier he gets — until his thick brogue renders him completely undecipherable.

MARY MEEKLY (female; age range 50s to 70s) — She is the mayor's wife. Small statured, she seems very sweet natured and makes a good match for her husband.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

The auditions for Unnecessary Farce will be held as an "open call." This means you do not have to schedule an appointment in advance.

Please pick one of the two audition days — either Sunday, Dec. 7 at 8 p.m. or Monday, Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. — and arrive at the appointed time.

The auditions will consist of "cold readings" from the script.

Copies of the script are available for borrowing at the Weathervane Box Office during the following hours only:
• Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

> CLICK HERE to buy the script.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S REHEARSALS

A complete schedule of the rehearsals will be available at the auditions. Though subject to change, a typical Weathervane rehearsal schedule for a Mainstage production such as this would be Sundays through Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m.

Please bring your calendar with you to the auditions in order to declare any "conflict dates" between Feb. 1 and May 10, 2015. Conflict dates reported after the show has been cast may result in re-casting.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S PERFORMANCES

Unnecessary Farce will play for 12 performances on Weathervane Playhouse's Founders Theater stage between April 23 and May 10, 2015.

Thursday, April 23 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 24 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, April 25 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 26 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 30 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 1 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 2 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 3 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, May 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 8 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 9 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 10 at 2:30 p.m.

ABOUT THE PLAY AND THE PLAYWRIGHT

Two cops...three crooks...eight doors...go! That's a very quick summation of Unnecessary Farce.

In a cheap motel room, an embezzling mayor is supposed to meet with his female accountant, while in the room next-door, two undercover cops wait to catch the meeting on videotape. But there's some confusion as to who's in which room, who's being videotaped, who's taken the money, who's hired a hit man, and why the accountant keeps taking off her clothes.

PAUL SLADE SMITH is a New York actor and writer. His play Unnecessary Farce premiered at the humble and fearless BoarsHead Theater in Lansing, Michigan in October of 2006, and by the end of 2013 saw its hundredth production. As an actor, Mr. Smith has appeared in the national touring companies of Wicked and The Phantom of the Opera, as well as regional theatres including The Goodman Theatre, Steppenwolf and Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (where he appeared in The School For Lies, an adaptation of The Misanthrope by David Ives). He is currently at work on his next play, A Real Lulu.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S DIRECTOR

MARC MORITZ’s most recent Weathervane directing assignment was last season’s Don't Dress for Dinner. Previously for Weathervane he directed The 39 Steps, 3 Guys Naked from the Waist Down and Shine! with special guest artist Hal Linden. Elsewhere, his directing credits include A Raisin in the Sun at TrueNorth Cultural Arts; The Walworth Farce, Guttenberg! The Musical! and Tigers Be Still at Dobama Theatre; A Broadway Christmas Carol at Clague Playhouse; Frankie and Johnny in Clair De Lune and a staged concert version of Merrily We Roll Along for Blank Canvas Theatre. As an actor, Marc originated the role of Talk Show Host in the Broadway production of the Stephen Sondheim musical Merrily We Roll Along. In the summer of 2013, he played Otto Frank in The Diary of Anne Frank and Sydney Black in Light Up the Sky at Oberlin Summer Theatre. Porthouse Theatre audiences may also recognize him as Al Lewis in The Sunshine Boys. His other regional credits as an actor include Cleveland Play House, Riverside Shakespeare, Long Wharf Theatre, Goodman Theatre, New Harmony Theatre and the Great Lakes Theater Festival and Idaho Shakespeare Festival co-production of Into the Woods. Favorite roles: Mushnik in Little Shop of Horrors, Tateh in Ragtime, The Cat in the Hat in Seussical, Chico in The Cocoanuts, Malvolio in Twelfth Night, Ezekial Cheever in The Crucible and Emperor Joseph in Amadeus. Marc was the founder/artistic director of Cleveland’s popular Giant Portions Improv Company and has taught and performed with ImprovOlympic and The Second City in both Chicago and New York. In 2012, he received his master of fine arts degree from Kent State University.


 

 

"A Delicate Balance"AUDITION DATES

Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, beginning at 7 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 12, 2015, beginning at 7 p.m.
(Callbacks: Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015, at 7 p.m.)

 

ABOUT THE PLAY

In this drama by Edward Albee, we meet the wealthy middle-aged couple Agnes and Tobias, who have their complacency shattered when Harry and Edna, their longtime friends, suddenly appear at their doorstep. Claiming that an encroaching, nameless "fear" has forced them to flee their own home, these neighbors bring a firestorm of doubt, recrimination and ultimately solace — upsetting the "delicate balance" of Agnes and Tobias' household. Winner of the 1967 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

For more information about the play and its notable productions and adapatations, CLICK HERE to visit the show's Wikipedia page.

CASTING REQUIREMENTS

A Delicate Balance requires an ensemble of six ADULT actors — four women and two men.

CHARACTER BREAKDOWN

(Please note that the suggested ages listed below are meant to represent the age range a person “can play” – not what’s on his or her birth certificate!)

AGNES (approximate age range: late 50s to early 60s) — Agnes is the main female character of the play. She is woman in her fifties, well off, and married to Tobias. She is also the mother of Julia and the sister of Claire. Agnes believes herself to be the fulcrum of the family, keeping everyone in balance. She often maintains this balance, or order, by not confronting issues, not taking a stand, and not processing emotions. She tries to keep the peace by not dealing with anything that might upset it.

CLAIRE (approximate age range: late 50s to early 60s) — Claire is Agnes’s younger sister. She claims that she is not an alcoholic but rather a willful drinker. Of all the characters in the play, whether it is due to the alcohol or not, Claire has the loosest tongue. She speaks her mind and is the least affected by social politeness.

EDNA (approximate age range: late 50s to early 60s) — Edna is Harry’s wife. It is not clear if she is really Agnes’s friend or if she and Agnes know one another only because their husbands are friends. Edna arrives one day at the door of Agnes and Tobias’s home. She takes it for granted that they will let her and Harry stay there for however long it takes them to get over their unnamed fear.

HARRY (approximate age range: late 50s to early 60s) — Harry is Edna’s husband and Tobias’s best friend. At one point in the past, Harry and Tobias, coincidentally, had an extramarital affair with the same young woman. Besides both having been businessmen and meeting at the same club, it is unclear what else Harry and Tobias have in common except that they have known one another for a long time and neither sleeps with his wife. Harry is something of a reflection of Tobias, but he is even more reserved. Of all the characters in this play, Harry speaks the least. And when he does speak, he is a man of few words with lots of pauses around each one. He prefers to talk around things rather than going at them straight on.

JULIA is the thirty-six-year-old daughter of Agnes and Tobias. Three times divorced, she has just recently left her fourth husband and has returned home. Her father calls her a whiner, and her mother has little time for her. Julia, based on a relative of Albee’s, his cousin Barbara Lauder, has set a pattern in her life of marrying for the wrong reasons and then divorcing and returning home. Her parents welcome her, although they make it clear that they wish she would establish an independent life of her own.

TOBIAS (approximate age range: late 50s to early 60s) — Tobias is Agnes’s husband and the father of Julia. He is a well-to-do, retired businessman. Although he is tolerant of people around him, he, like his wife, tends to avoid emotional topics. His tolerance toward his sister-in-law Claire is shown in his non-judgmental attitude toward her drinking. Although he encourages her to return to Alcoholics Anonymous at one point in the play, he does not berate her for drinking. In some ways, he even encourages it or at least does not discourage it. There are a few subtle insinuations that Claire and Tobias might have at one time had an affair, but this is initially only alluded to by script directions that have Claire open her arms to Tobias in a “casual invitation”. Later in the play, Agnes asks Tobias (when he cannot sleep) if he went to Claire.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

The auditions for A Delicate Balance will be held by appointment only. On each audition night, audition appointments are available in five-minute intervals.

To schedule your audition appointment, please call the Weathervane Playhouse box office at 330-836-2626. Please call during regular box office hours only: Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Please note: The box office and business office will close at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 23 and remain closed until 10 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 5, 2015.

WHAT TO PREPARE FOR YOUR AUDITION

Please prepare a two- to three-minute monologue (contemporary, dramatic or comedic). The monologue MAY be from the script, but it does not HAVE to be.

CLICK HERE to read a portion of the script online via Google Books

CLICK HERE to buy the script.

► Copies of the script are available for borrowing at the Weathervane Box Office during the following hours only:
• Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Please note: The box office and business office will close at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 23 and remain closed until 10 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 5, 2015.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S REHEARSALS

A complete schedule of the rehearsals will be available at the auditions. Though subject to change, a typical Weathervane rehearsal schedule for a Mainstage production such as this would be Sundays through Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m.

Please bring your calendar with you to the auditions in order to declare any "conflict dates" between Jan. 18 and April 12, 2015. Conflict dates reported after the show has been cast may result in re-casting.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S PERFORMANCES

A Delicate Balance will play for 11 performances on Weathervane Playhouse's Founders Theater stage between March 26 and April 12, 2015.

Thursday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, March 27 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, March 28 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, March 29 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 2 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 3 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, April 4 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 5 (Easter Sunday) — NO performance today

Thursday, April 9 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 10 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, April 11 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 12 at 2:30 p.m.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S DIRECTOR

A native of Canton, CRAIG JOSEPH was bitten by the theater bug at an early age, and could be found producing short plays and puppet shows in the backyard with the neighborhood kids. After receiving a fantastic arts education in Plain Local Schools, Craig pursued his Bachelors in English and Theology at Wake Forest University (all the while acting and directing), and then went on to receive a Masters in Directing from Northwestern University. A ten-year sojourn in Chicago garnered him professional directing credits with Writers Theatre, White Horse Theatre, and TimeLine Theatre, among others. Contemporaneously, he acted occasionally and wrote several plays, short fiction pieces and a screenplay. Never content to just do one thing, the Chicago decade also found Craig working in a variety of church and nonprofit contexts as a youth pastor, associate pastor, arts educator, college professor and church planter. Through these experiences, Craig developed a passion for merging the arts world with social justice concerns. His next career move, which took him to Minneapolis, found him serving as the Creative Director for a progressive congregation which utilized the arts to foster racial reconciliation, poverty awareness and neighborhood revitalization; all the while, Craig continued directing professionally. A surprise move back home to Ohio six years ago has propelled Craig in a new direction. Now serving as the curator of Translations Art Gallery and as the Creative Director for a branding and identity agency called Cassel Bear, he gets to play with the interaction between words and images all day. He continues telling stories on the stage, with recent directing credits of The Elephant Man, Cat On a Hot Tin Roof, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Other Desert Cities and God of Carnage. He also began acting again, tackling the challenge of a one-man play, Lee Blessing’s Chesapeake, and being very short as Lord Farquaad in Shrek. As ever, Craig would like to thank his family for their support of his multi-directional, oft-indecipherable life and career trajectory. And he thanks you for supporting the arts, so that he can continue to do what he loves.

ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT

EDWARD ALBEE is perhaps best known for his association with the artistic movement of the 1950s and early 1960s more popularly regarded as "the theater of the absurd." Born in Washington, D.C., on March 12, 1928, Albee’s parents abandoned him as a baby. A wealthy couple who owned a theatre chain, Reed and Frances Albee, adopted the infant boy. The Albees named their son after his adoptive paternal grandfather, Edward Franklin Albee, a powerful vaudeville producer who had made the family fortune as a partner in the Keith-Albee Theater Circuit. Despite the lavish environment in which he grew up in affluent Westchester, New York, he was, by most accounts, unhappy. He attended Trinity College, a small liberal arts school in Hartford, Connecticut for a year. After failing to show up for the school’s chapel services, as well as certain classes, Albee was dismissed by the school. At the age of 20, Albee left home and settled in Greenwich Village in New York City. He took on various jobs, including the roles of  “office boy,” record salesman, and Western Union messenger. During his early years in Manhattan, he also began to meet other writers, including Thornton Wilder and W. H. Auden.

It was Wilder who suggested that he try his hand at plays. At the age of 30, Albee wrote his first play, The Zoo Story, in a quick, three-week period. Albee's first full-length, three-act play was Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and its 1962 Broadway production won the Tony Award for Best Play. Centered on fractured family relationships, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  won him international fame and opened new doors of artistic opportunities. Albee’s other plays include The American Dream, Tiny Alice, All Over, Seascape (Pulitzer Prize winner), The Lady From Dubuque, The Man Who Had Three Arms, Finding the Sun, Three Tall Women (Pulitzer Prize winner), Fragments, The Play About the Baby, Occupant and The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? He is a member of the Dramatists Guild Council and president of the Edward F. Albee Foundation. He was awarded the Gold Medal in Drama from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1980 and in 1996 received the Kennedy Center Honors and the National Medal of Arts.

Ever the iconoclast, Albee himself once summed up his career for an interviewer by declaring, "I have been both overpraised and underpraised. I assume by the time I finish writing — and I plan to go on writing until I'm 90 or gaga — it will all equal itself out. You can't involve yourself with the vicissitudes of fashion or critical response."



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