Shows & Events

Upcoming Auditions

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GET THE AUDITION INFO

GET THE AUDITION INFO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

"Hamlet"AUDITION DATES

Monday, Dec. 15, 2014 (by appointment only between 5 and 7 p.m.)
Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014 (by appointment only between 5 and 7 p.m.)

CASTING REQUIREMENTS

Hamlet requires a large ensemble of male and female actors.

Because Hamlet is a Young Actor Series production, the roles are restricted primarily to actors between the ages of 13 and 23.

However, actors ages 24 and older may audition for three roles only: Polonius, Queen Gertrude and Osric.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

Please prepare one memorized classical monologue that is approximately one to two minutes in length.

What is a classical monologue?

Generally speaking, a classical monologue is one that comes from a play written by either one of the ancient Greeks (Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles) or Shakesspeare. However, other playwrights who composed classical monlogues include Moliere, Marlowe and Ben Jonson.

CLICK HERE for classical monologues for men.

CLICK HERE for clasical monologues for women.

HOW TO SCHEDULE AN AUDITION APPOINTMENT

The auditions for Hamlet are scheduled in advance by appointments. On each audition day, actors will be slotted into 10-minute intervals. However, you may be asked to stay longer than 10 minutes at the auditions.

The audition appointments for Hamlet are being scheduled online only. Please do NOT call the Box Office to schedule your audition appointment.

CLICK HERE to schedule your Hamlet audition appointment.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S REHEARSALS

Rehearsals will begin Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014, and will then be held five days a week: Sundays from noon to 3 p.m. and Mondays through Thursdays from 6 to 8 p.m.

Please bring your calendar with you to the auditions in order to declare any "conflict dates" between Dec. 28, 2014, and March 8, 2015. Conflict dates reported after the show has been cast may result in re-casting.

The show's “tech” rehearsals are listed below. Please be aware that attendance at all technical rehearsals is mandatory. Conflicts of any kind cannot be accepted for these rehearsals.

Sunday, Feb. 22, 2014: Noon to 8 p.m. (“double dress” rehearsal)
Monday, Feb. 23, 2014: 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (technical rehearsal No. 2)
Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2014: 5 to 9 p.m. (technical rehearsal No. 3)
Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2014: 5 to 9 p.m. (the final technical rehearsal)

ABOUT THE PLAY'S PERFORMANCES

Hamlet will play for nine performances on Weathervane Playhouse's Founders Theater stage between Feb. 26 and March 8, 2015.

Please note: The performance schedule below includes three weekday-morning, school-day matinees:

Thursday, Feb. 26 at 10 a.m.
Friday, Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 28 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 1 at 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 3 at 10 a.m.
Thursday, March 5 at 10 a.m.
Friday, March 6 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 8, at 2:30 p.m. (followed by the attendance-is-mandatory strike of the show's set and props)

ABOUT THE PLAY

“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark!” When the King of Denmark is murdered, young Prince Hamlet seeks revenge against his Uncle Claudius for the untimely death of his father!

More About the Play

From Wikipedia: "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, often shortened to Hamlet, is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare at an uncertain date between 1599 and 1602. Set in the Kingdom of Denmark, the play dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet is instructed to enact on his uncle Claudius. Claudius had murdered his own brother — Hamlet's father King Hamlet — and subsequently seized the throne, marrying his deceased brother's widow, Hamlet's mother Gertrude.

"Hamlet is Shakespeare's longest play and among the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature, with a story capable of "seemingly endless retelling and adaptation by others." The play seems to have been one of Shakespeare's most popular works during his lifetime and still ranks among his most-performed, topping the performance list of the Royal Shakespeare Company and its predecessors in Stratford-upon-Avon since 1879. It has inspired writers from Goethe and Dickens to Joyce and Murdoch, and has been described as "the world's most filmed story after Cinderella.

"The play's structure and depth of characterization have inspired much critical scrutiny. One such example is the centuries-old debate about Hamlet's hesitation to kill his uncle, which some see as merely a plot device to prolong the action, but which others argue is a dramatization of the complex philosophical and ethical issues that surround cold-blooded murder, calculated revenge, and thwarted desire. More recently, psychoanalytic critics have examined Hamlet's unconscious desires, and feminist critics have re-evaluated and rehabilitated the often maligned characters of Ophelia and Gertrude."

ABOUT THE SHOW'S DIRECTOR

John DavisJOHN DAVIS previously for Weathervane Playhouse directed Our Town in 2013, The Taming of the Shrew in 2012 and the world-premiere production of Art of Deduction: Inside the Mind of Sherlock Holmes in 2011. A professional actor, director and fight choreographer for nearly 30 years, he is best know for his comic sword-fighting show, Hack and Slash, which has been seen in 16 countries with more than 4,000 performances (including more than 100 performances for the allied forces in both Iraq and Afghanistan).

He has received certification from five major stage-combat organizations worldwide and is a recognized instructor with the International Order of the Sword and Pen. Locally, he has taught courses for the theater department at Oberlin College and he directed Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead for the Cleveland Shakespeare Festival.


 

 

 

"A Raisin in the Sun" -- Jan. 29 to Feb. 15, 2014

AUDITION DATES

Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014 at 7 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 1, 2014 at 7 p.m.
Callbacks: Wednesday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m.

CASTING REQUIREMENTS

A Raisin in the Sun requires a racially diverse ensemble of ADULT male and female actors — plus ONE YOUNG BOY between the ages of 9 and 14.

For adults, the age range is between the ages of 18 to 65.

Character Breakdown

LENA "MAMA" YOUNGER (African America female; age range 50-65) The mother of Walter Lee and Beneatha, mother-in-law of Ruth, and grandmother of Travis. Every action she takes is borne out of her abiding love for her family, her deep religious convictions, and her strong will that is surpassed only by her compassion. Mama's selfless spirit is shown in her plans to use her $10,000 insurance check for the good of her family, part of which includes plans to purchase a house in a middle-class white neighborhood.

WALTER LEE YOUNGER (African American male; age range 25-40) — In his middle thirties, he is the husband of Ruth, father of Travis, brother of Beneatha, and son of Lena (Mama) Younger. Walter works as a chauffeur and drinks a bit too much at times. When he discovers that his mother will receive a $10,000 check from his father's insurance, he becomes obsessed with his dreams of a business venture which will give him financial independence and, in his mind, will make him a more valuable human being.

RUTH YOUNGER (African American female; age range 25-35) — The thirtyish wife of Walter Lee Younger and the mother of Travis, their 10-year-old son. Ruth acts as peacemaker in most of the explosive family situations. Very low-key, Ruth reveals her strongest emotions only when she learns of the possibility of their moving to a better neighborhood.

BENEATHA YOUNGER (African American female; age range 18-30) — The twentyish sister of Walter Lee and the daughter of Lena Younger. She is a college student planning to go to medical school. The only family member privileged to have the opportunity for a higher education, she is sometimes a little overbearing in the pride she takes in being an "intellectual."

TRAVIS YOUNGER (African American boy; age range 9-14) — The 10-year-old son of Walter and Ruth Younger. Living in a household with three generations in conflict, Travis skillfully plays each adult against the other and is, as a result, somewhat "spoiled." In spite of this, he is a likeable child.

JOSEPH ASAGAI (African American male; age range 20-30) — An African college student from Nigeria, Asagai is one of Beneatha's suitors. Mannerly, good looking, and personable, he is well liked by all members of the Younger household.

GEORGE MURCHISON (African American male; age range 20-35) — Beneatha's other boyfriend, he, too, is a college student. His wealthy background alienates him from the poverty of the Youngers. Easily impressed, Ruth is the only member of the Younger household who naively overlooks George's offensive snobbishness.

KARL LINDNER (white male; age range 30-50) — A weak and ineffectual middle-aged white man, Lindner is the spokesman for the white community into which the Youngers plan to move. He has been sent to persuade the Youngers to not move into the white neighborhood. In fact, he has been authorized by the white community to offer the Youngers a monetary incentive not to move in.

BOBO (African American male; age range 30-45) — The somewhat dimwitted friend of Walter Lee who, along with another friend, Willy, plans to invest in Walter Lee's business scheme.

TWO MOVING MEN (age range 18-50) — Having no speaking parts, they enter at the end of the play to help the Youngers move to their new neighborhood.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

The auditions for A Raisin in the Sun will be held as an "open call." This means you do not have to schedule an appointment in advance. Instead, pick one of the two audition days — either Nov. 30 or Dec. 1 — and arrive at 7 p.m.

Please prepare one memorized dramatic monologue — classic or contemporary — that is approximately one to three minutes in length.

Additionally, you may be asked to do a "cold reading" from the script at the auditions.

Copies of the script are available for borrowing at the Weathervane Box Office during the following hours only:
• Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

> CLICK HERE to read a portion of the script online via Google Books.
> CLICK HERE to buy the script.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S REHEARSALS

A complete schedule of the rehearsals will be available at the auditions. Though subject to change, a typical Weathervane rehearsal schedule for a Mainstage production such as this would be Sundays through Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m.

Please bring your calendar with you to the auditions in order to declare any "conflict dates" between Dec. 1, 2014, and Feb. 15, 2015. Conflict dates reported after the show has been cast may result in re-casting.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S PERFORMANCES

A Raisin in the Sun will play for 13 performances on Weathervane Playhouse's Founders Theater stage between Jan. 29 and Feb. 15, 2015.

Please note: The performance schedule below also includes ONE weekday-morning, school-day matinee at 10 a.m.:

Thursday, Jan. 29 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 30 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 1 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 6 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 7 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 8 at 2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 10 a.m.

Thursday, Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 13 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 14 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 15 at 2:30 p.m.

ABOUT THE PLAY AND THE PLAYWRIGHT

Set on Chicago's South Side in the 1950s, A Raisin in the Sun revolves around the divergent dreams and conflicts within three generations of the Younger family: son Walter Lee, his wife Ruth, his sister Beneatha, his son Travis and matriarch Lena, whom everyone calls “Mama.” When her deceased husband’s money comes through, Mama dreams of moving to a new home and a better neighborhood in Chicago. Walter Lee, a chauffeur, has other plans: buying a liquor store and being his own man. Beneatha dreams of medical school. The tensions and prejudice they face form this seminal American drama. Originally produced in 1959, Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun was the first play written by an African American woman to be produced on Broadway, where it won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play. The Washington Post has called it “one of a handful of great American dramas. A Raisin in the Sun belongs in the inner circle, along with Death of a Salesman and Long Day’s Journey into Night.” The New York Times has hailed it as “the play that changed American theatre forever.”

Lorraine HansberryWhen LORRAINE HANSBERRY’s A Raisin in the Sun appeared on Broadway in 1959, the artist became at the age of 29 the youngest American playwright, the fifth woman, and the only African American to date to win the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play of the Year. The play represented a landmark. In its authentic depiction of black American life — and the vivid demonstration of so gifted a creator, cast, and director — it made it impossible for the American stage to ignore African American creativity and subject matter thereafter. In 1961, the film version won a special award at the Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for a Screen Writer’s Guild Award for Hansberry’s screenplay. In 1965, Lorraine Hansberry died of cancer at age 34. As if prescient, in the six years she had between the triumph of her first play and her death, she was extraordinarily prolific. Her second play to be produced on Broadway, The Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window, was in its early run (to mixed reviews) when Hansberry died. To Be Young, Gifted, and Black, an autobiographical portrait in her own words adapted by her former husband and literary executor Robert Nemiroff, was posthumously produced in 1969 and toured across the country. In 1970, Les Blancs, her play about the inevitability of struggle between colonizers and colonized in Africa, and the impending crisis that would surely grow out of it, ran on Broadway to critical acclaim. During her career as a playwright, Hansberry wrote many articles and essays on literary criticism, racism, sexism, homophobia, world peace and other social and political issues. At her death, she left behind file cabinets holding her public and private correspondence, speeches and journals, and various manuscripts in several genres: plays for stage and screen, essays, poetry, and an almost complete novel. (CLICK HERE for the source of this biographical sketch.)

ABOUT THE PLAY'S DIRECTOR

Jimmie D. WoodyAs a director, some of JIMMIE D. WOODY's most recent credits include: The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams, Two Trains Running and Joe Turner’s Come and Gone by August Wilson, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf  by Ntozake Shange (all at Tri-C, Cuyahoga Community College); Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman (at Cleveland Public Library and The Cleveland Botanical Garden and Tri-C JazzFest Cleveland); When the Chickens Came Home to Roost by Laurence Holder (at Karamu House); The Baachae written by Wole Soyinka (at Cleveland Public Theatre and Columbia University); 365 days/365 plays by Suzanne Lori Parks, Song by Daniel Gray Kontar, InCogNegro by Lisa Langford (all at Cleveland Public Theatre); Wilberforce by Keith Josef Adkins and Underground Griots by Natalie Parker & Keith Josef Adkins (at Here Café/NYC, Cleveland Public Theatre and The National Black Theater Festival). Mr. Woody is a Resident Teaching Artist of Theater at Center For Arts-Inspired Learning. He also teaches acting classes at Cuyahoga Community College Metropolitan Campus, The Cleveland School of the Arts and Progressive Arts Alliance.

 


 

 

AUDITION DATES

Sunday, Dec. 7 at 8 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 8 at 7 p.m.
(Callbacks: Sunday, Dec. 14 at 6 p.m.)

CASTING REQUIREMENTS

Unnecessary Farce requires an ensemble of seven ADULT actors — four men and three women — between the ages of 20s to 70s.

Character Breakdown

ERIC SHERIDAN (male; age range 30s) A bookish, even-keeled police officer who's thrown into some difficult situations — while not wearing any pants.

BILLIE DWYER (female; age range 20s/30s) — A police officer, she is Eric's partner. Although she seems to lack every skill needed for police work, she is enthusiastic and eager to succeed.

KAREN BROWN (female; age range 30s) — An accountant who usually has a very professsional demeanor, but seems unable to keep herself in control today.

MAYOR MEEKLY (male; age range 50s to 70s) — He is a sweet, gentle fellow who seems very innocent (and with a capital "I")!

AGENT FRANK (male; age range 20s to 50s) — He's the Town Hall head of security. Although he can seem confident and gruff, in moments of crisis he is easily reduced to being a very frightened man.

TODD (male; age range 20s to 50s) — He speaks with a pronounced Scottish accent. He's a professional hit man whose accent gets thicker the angrier he gets — until his thick brogue renders him completely undecipherable.

MARY MEEKLY (female; age range 50s to 70s) — She is the mayor's wife. Small statured, she seems very sweet natured and makes a good match for her husband.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

The auditions for Unnecessary Farce will be held as an "open call." This means you do not have to schedule an appointment in advance.

Please pick one of the two audition days — either Sunday, Dec. 7 at 8 p.m. or Monday, Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. — and arrive at the appointed time.

The auditions will consist of "cold readings" from the script.

Copies of the script are available for borrowing at the Weathervane Box Office during the following hours only:
• Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

> CLICK HERE to buy the script.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S REHEARSALS

A complete schedule of the rehearsals will be available at the auditions. Though subject to change, a typical Weathervane rehearsal schedule for a Mainstage production such as this would be Sundays through Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m.

Please bring your calendar with you to the auditions in order to declare any "conflict dates" between Feb. 1 and May 10, 2015. Conflict dates reported after the show has been cast may result in re-casting.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S PERFORMANCES

Unnecessary Farce will play for 12 performances on Weathervane Playhouse's Founders Theater stage between April 23 and May 10, 2015.

Thursday, April 23 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 24 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, April 25 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 26 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 30 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 1 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 2 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 3 at 2:30 p.m.

Thursday, May 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, May 8 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 9 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 10 at 2:30 p.m.

ABOUT THE PLAY AND THE PLAYWRIGHT

Two cops...three crooks...eight doors...go! That's a very quick summation of Unnecessary Farce.

In a cheap motel room, an embezzling mayor is supposed to meet with his female accountant, while in the room next-door, two undercover cops wait to catch the meeting on videotape. But there's some confusion as to who's in which room, who's being videotaped, who's taken the money, who's hired a hit man, and why the accountant keeps taking off her clothes.

PAUL SLADE SMITH is a New York actor and writer. His play Unnecessary Farce premiered at the humble and fearless BoarsHead Theater in Lansing, Michigan in October of 2006, and by the end of 2013 saw its hundredth production. As an actor, Mr. Smith has appeared in the national touring companies of Wicked and The Phantom of the Opera, as well as regional theatres including The Goodman Theatre, Steppenwolf and Chicago Shakespeare Theatre (where he appeared in The School For Lies, an adaptation of The Misanthrope by David Ives). He is currently at work on his next play, A Real Lulu.

ABOUT THE PLAY'S DIRECTOR

MARC MORITZ’s most recent Weathervane directing assignment was last season’s Don't Dress for Dinner. Previously for Weathervane he directed The 39 Steps, 3 Guys Naked from the Waist Down and Shine! with special guest artist Hal Linden. Elsewhere, his directing credits include A Raisin in the Sun at TrueNorth Cultural Arts; The Walworth Farce, Guttenberg! The Musical! and Tigers Be Still at Dobama Theatre; A Broadway Christmas Carol at Clague Playhouse; Frankie and Johnny in Clair De Lune and a staged concert version of Merrily We Roll Along for Blank Canvas Theatre. As an actor, Marc originated the role of Talk Show Host in the Broadway production of the Stephen Sondheim musical Merrily We Roll Along. In the summer of 2013, he played Otto Frank in The Diary of Anne Frank and Sydney Black in Light Up the Sky at Oberlin Summer Theatre. Porthouse Theatre audiences may also recognize him as Al Lewis in The Sunshine Boys. His other regional credits as an actor include Cleveland Play House, Riverside Shakespeare, Long Wharf Theatre, Goodman Theatre, New Harmony Theatre and the Great Lakes Theater Festival and Idaho Shakespeare Festival co-production of Into the Woods. Favorite roles: Mushnik in Little Shop of Horrors, Tateh in Ragtime, The Cat in the Hat in Seussical, Chico in The Cocoanuts, Malvolio in Twelfth Night, Ezekial Cheever in The Crucible and Emperor Joseph in Amadeus. Marc was the founder/artistic director of Cleveland’s popular Giant Portions Improv Company and has taught and performed with ImprovOlympic and The Second City in both Chicago and New York. In 2012, he received his master of fine arts degree from Kent State University.



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